Women in Cybersecurity2017-11-07T15:10:44+00:00
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Women in Cybersecurity

Did you know there is a women in cybersecurity conference WiCyS? The goal of the conference is to encourage more women to enter the field of cybersecurity.

Despite the growing demand and tremendous opportunities in the job market, cybersecurity remains an area where there is a significant shortage of skilled cyber professionals regionally, nationally, and internationally. That shortage becomes even more significant when you consider that 89% of the existing cybermarket is male-dominated with 11% of the professional community consisting of women.

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The first study recognizing the industry’s struggles to attract women was published by IEEE Computer Society in 2009 and highlighted the required skills, existing challenges and key success factors for women in the field.  One of the findings the study identified was that IT’s “hacker culture” in combination with social expectations was a primary contributor in social and institutional obstacles. Other study’s attribute a lack of educational focus on and interest from women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields.

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Unique Opportunities for Women

Associations, scholarship opportunities and initiatives have begun springing up everywhere to encourage not only women, but also minorities, to consider entering and advancing in IT and cybersecurity fields as the demand (and subsequent shortage of professionals) grows. Initiatives like the Anita Borg Institute, CISSE Women and Minority in Cyber Security Working Group and #brainbabe encourage and help women develop careers and make contributions to the technical fields.

Women in Cybersecurity Conference

(WiCyS) Conference – Women in Cybersecurity

Join the Women in Cybersecurity Conference in Tucson, AZ on March 31st-April 1st for WiCyS 2017

The conference also has a Scholarship WICyS.

“I know women who are very technical such as developers and penetration testers, and I know other women who are more high level in the industry such as directors of security programs. Both types of women are great in their specific roles. I think it really just depends on what you are interested in and passionate about.”
Heather Kingsbury, PWC, Cyber Security and Privacy Consultant

In order to gain a better perspective on women in cybersecurity we interviewed Heather.